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Globalstar FM15 Mission



On Sunday, June 19 at 12:27 a.m. ET, Falcon 9 launched Globalstar FM15 to low-Earth orbit from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.

This was the ninth launch and landing of this booster, which previously supported the launch of Crew-1, Crew-2, SXM-8, CRS-23, IXPE, one Starlink mission, Transporter-4, and Transporter-5.

28 Comments

  1. Jessie Anderson is very kindly and gently presenter. I like to listen to her explanations.

  2. It never gets old. It never gets amazing that SpaceX makes it look routine to land a booster from space onto a ship , at sea, at night. Those of you who are too young to remember , but this was pure science fiction not that long ago.

  3. Man, the onboard and drone ship cams are so reliable now! Thanks SpaceX for fixing that problem

  4. You are on the right track, SpaceX; 3 rockets in 48 hours, is impressive — today; tomorrow, not so much. To launch your aspirational 1000 starships to Mars, including orbital refueling, will require 9 launches per day for an entire year. Keep up the good work.

  5. Disappointed that she lacks the ability to make an elementary distinction between a natural weather phenomena of lighting that is occurring in the background versus the nitrogen gas thrusts from the rocket which obviously doesn't emit photons.

  6. Once starship becomes operational will there still be a place for falcon 9 or will she get mothballed?

  7. Always have a safe and successful launches and safe returns NASA or whatever you call yourself SpaceX we still love all the science!

  8. I watched Inspiration 4 launch in person. Such an amazing sight! Never gets old!

  9. @13:50 presenter calling out "bursts of nitrogen"?

    But between @12:50 and @14:15 you can see these slowly moving across the screen, might those be thunder storms we are seeing from above?

  10. I never tire of watching Falcon 9 launch and still get goose pimples when the countdown starts from ten down to zero and lift-off. I remain excited and anxious until the first stage lands and stay that way until the mission is complete. It is amazing technology. It is still hard to believe that SpaceX continues to make the landing of the stage one routine, so beautiful to watch. Thank you, SpaceX, and everyone who helps make these missions work.

  11. It's amazing how that little Dot looks like it's going slow but it's moving from one end of the state of Maine to the other in less than 30 seconds. That's screaming!